Hardwood Artisans' 42,000-square-foot Culpeper, Virginia, facility.
David Edward's Luna Lounge Seating collection.
Gutierrez Studios' 20,000-square-foot facility in the Clipper Mill complex of Baltimore.
Gutierrez Studios' custom steel bar stools.
Salvations Architectural Furnishings' 3,000-square-foot Silver Spring, Maryland, studio.
Salvations Architectural Furnishings' Cross Table in a Vintage Steel finish with gray-stained white oak.
Hardwood Artisans' custom coffee table.
David Edward's facilities in Baltimore.
Niermann Weeks’s Millersville, Maryland facility.
The Toulon Settee by Niermann Weeks.
Archer Modern’s VERO Collection.
At Showroom 1412, designer Lori Graham’s Leo Dining Table.
David Iastesta's three-sided Luscian Table.

Home Grown

DC-area artisans create furniture that embodies style and innovation

For some furniture shoppers, the idea of a custom piece handmade by local artisans is an alluring one. There is something invitingly personal about furniture that’s been designed and produced virtually in your own backyard. Fortunately, the DC area is rife with furniture makers who design and produce their work locally. From companies like Niermann Weeks and David Iatesta, Inc., whose furnishings, lighting and accessories are known—and sold—throughout the country, to others that are sold only in the DC area, prospective buyers can find styles, materials and price points to suit every preference. On the following pages, we’ve compiled a selection of some of the area’s finest furniture makers—each of which has a trade-only or retail presence in the area—with a sampling of what they make and a glimpse of how and where they make it.

HARDWOOD ARTISANS
Hardwood Artisans has four retail showrooms in the DC area, and the company’s 40 craftsmen design and manufacture a collection of more than 800 furniture pieces. All are produced locally in the company’s 42,000-square-foot Culpeper, Virginia, facility. The custom coffee table on the left combines a surface of naturally lacquered, quarter-sawn sycamore with curved legs of solid, black-lacquered ash through which the grain of the wood is visible. hardwoodartisans.com

DAVID EDWARD
Family-owned David Edward works with a range of designers to create its transitional and modern seating and occasional pieces. Facilities in Baltimore (left) and York, Pennsylvania, produce the company’s handcrafted, sustainable furniture designs, which are available locally through Vastu in DC. The sleekly modern Luna Lounge Seating collection (left) was designed by architect Roger Crowley with sculptural, cantilevered arms and solid metal legs in polished nickel. The series also includes a settee. davidedward.com; vastudc.com

GUTIERREZ STUDIOS
Gutierrez Studios custom designs and manufactures its wood-and-metal furniture and architectural elements in its 20,000-square-foot facility in the Clipper Mill complex of Baltimore, where a worker uses a soldering tool to weld gracefully arcing metal pieces. Metalwork artisans evoke an industrial aesthetic with a selection of custom steel bar stools that include the Bizzochi Stool, matte-finished, hot-rolled steel with leather seat and back; and the Good Love Stool, clear-finished, cold-rolled steel with leather sling seat. Each is available in three sizes. gutierrezstudios.com

SALVATIONS ARCHITECTURAL FURNISHINGS
Salvations Architectural Furnishings creates iron furniture and architectural elements at forges in Virginia, then brings the pieces to its 3,000-square-foot Silver Spring, Maryland, studio to be hand finished in a dust-free environment. For its most recent collection, the company teamed up with DC designer David Mitchell to produce a line of occasional, coffee and dining tables. The Cross Table in a Vintage Steel finish with gray-stained white oak. salvationsaf.com

ARCHER Modern
Though its showroom is in Georgetown’s Cady’s Alley, Archer Modern designs its own contemporary furniture and has it manufactured in several locations: Upholstery is done in a Rockville workroom, woodwork in Culpeper, Virginia, and metalwork by Gutierrez Studios in Baltimore; stone and glass are sourced in Virginia. Among Archer’s latest offerings: the Jacobsen collection, by renowned local architects Hugh Newell Jacobsen and Simon Jacobsen. The VERO Collection of seating with lucite details. archermodern.com

SHOWROOM 1412
Showroom 1412, designer Lori Graham’s chic store in DC’s 14th Street Corridor, showcases LG Place, her collection of furniture and accessories. Designed exclusively by Graham, the collection is produced by furniture makers in Alexandria and Fries, Virginia, as well as by furniture building company Mitchell Yanosky, LLC, in its facility in Baltimore. Graham’s Leo Dining Table has a black-lacquer base and stained oak top, but can be custom made in walnut or cherry to suit the buyer. showroom1412.com

NIERMANN WEEKS
The Toulon Settee by nationally known furniture maker Niermann Weeks is emblematic of the company’s elegant portfolio of furniture, lighting and accessories. Made of wrought iron with lacquered enamel insets, it can be customized for indoor or outdoor use. It’s pictured here in an indoor finish of Orleans steel with distressed gold leaf accents. The seat cushion is button-tufted, as are the two bolster pillows. Niermann Weeks’s handcrafted collection is produced in its Millersville, Maryland facility (below left), and available locally at its DC Design Center showroom. niermannweeks.com

DAVID IASTESTA, INC.
Now available nationally, David Iatesta, Inc., got its start in the DC area and is headquartered in Stevensville, Maryland, near Annapolis. Furniture, lighting and accessories by David Iatesta, Inc., borrow elements from 18th- and 19th-century styles that are modernized for today’s use, and utilize Old World furniture-building traditions. Furniture is sold locally through Holly Hunt DC. Seen here in Textured Gray Sage, the three-sided Luscian Table is solid wood, embellished with a handcarved metal X on each side and handpainted in multiple layers. Thirty of David Iatesta’s custom furniture pieces are now available for shipping within 10 days instead of the usual four to six weeks. davidiatesta.com