A 40-foot-long wall of carved Indian sandstone anchors the bar, which is enclosed in backlit panels of translucent onyx.
The restaurant's dazzling Sheesh Mahal, or “palace of mirrors,” is sheathed in 150,000 handcrafted mirrors.
The chutney flight appetizer.
Gucchi galouti, a ghee-smoked, morel-and-cremini pâté.
The dining room boasts hand-carved fretwork that recalls railroad cars.
The restaurant's dazzling Sheesh Mahal, or “palace of mirrors,” is sheathed in 150,000 handcrafted mirrors.
The chutney flight appetizer.
Gucchi galouti, a ghee-smoked, morel-and-cremini pâté.
The dining room boasts hand-carved fretwork that recalls railroad cars.

Passage to India

Punjab Grill transports guests with bespoke interiors and innovative cuisine

When the owners of Punjab Grill decided to bring an authentic Indian experience to Washington, they took the concept quite literally. This new, 4,700-square-foot restaurant was outfitted entirely with carved-stone friezes, hand-finished fretwork, inlaid marble and custom furnishings—all crafted by artisans in India and expedited to DC in five shipping containers.

Jaipur-based Amit Krishn Gulati and Grupo7 Architecture + Interiors in DC collaborated on the design. “We built every element from scratch and it’s been humbling to watch it come to fruition over the past two years,” says Karan Singh, CEO of Punjab Grill US (the company also operates outposts in Singapore, Abu Dhabi and Bangkok).

Chef Jaspratap Bindra, who hails from Punjab, regales diners with regional classics and creations bearing a global twist: Tiny rounds of naan stand in for blinis in his caviar service and a riff on burrata pairs the Italian cheese with spiced eggplant and heirloom tomatoes. The journey is a feast for the palate—and the eyes. 427 11th Street, NW; 202-813-3004. punjabgrilldc.com