Home & Design

In the Round Architect Wayne Good was asked to overhaul a 1930s Cape Cod on Round Bay near Annapolis. “The existing house put all its energy into fronting the street,” says Good. “It’s a spectacular site, so we opened it out in back.” Good raised the roof to move the master bedroom upstairs, adding a private balcony with a round, overscaled window that he “designed as a strong presence to stand up to the greater riverscape,” he explains. Only the bottom two window openings are glassed in to meet safety codes; the glassed sections create passive solar gain, allowing the owners to enjoy the space well into fall.

Renovation Architecture: Wayne Good, FAIA, Good Architecture, Annapolis, Maryland. Photography: Celia Pearson.

Mediterranean Vibe On the grounds of a Gibson Island residence, interior designer Erin Paige Pitts worked with landscape architect Jay Graham to create an idyllic outdoor “room” overlooking the Magothy River. A pergola and travertine terrace “give a sense of scale to the outdoor setting,” says Pitts. With travertine pillars and blooming vines, the space conveys a Mediterranean vibe. All-weather Brown Jordan furniture, a Moroccan-inspired lantern and a batik tablecloth beckon guests for al fresco dining.

Design: Erin Paige Pitts, Erin Paige Pitts Interiors, Gibson Island, Maryland. Landscape Architecture: Jay Graham, FASLA, Graham Landscape Architecture, Annapolis, Maryland. Landscape Maintenance: Mike Prokopchak, Walnut Hill Landscape Company, Annapolis, Maryland. Photography: Geoffrey Hodgdon

Control Center
CHRISTIAN A. VIVES, A.B.E. Networks
What is the most significant new development in smart-home technology?
Near field communication. This wireless technology opens the door to a whole host of proximity-based features and functions that just weren’t practical before. Moving about the home with a phone in your pocket or a wearable device allows the systems to know where you are and adjust to your local environment accordingly. For example, as you enter a room, the lighting turns on to a specific level based on the time of day and the natural light coming in, thereby consuming the minimum amount of energy to keep it at your desired level. As you move from room to room, the light follows you; it can be tailored to each member of the family. Imagine now that we apply HVAC, audio/video and other systems to that same model and the home becomes truly adaptive to each individual.

What are the top 10 features no system should be without?
I would say that the ideal system should include the following 10 components:

  • Solid data network
  • Energy monitoring
  • Automated lighting and shades
  • Remote viewable security cameras
  • Distributed audio and video systems
  • Automated HVAC systems
  • Integrated media servers
  • Intelligent security systems
  • Electronic access control
  • Unified control system to integrate all of the above

EDDIE SHAPIRO, SmartTouch USA
When is the best time during construction or renovation to engage a home-automation company?
For residential renovations, updating a home’s electronic control systems—from security cameras to ultra-accelerated whole-home Wi-Fi and automated window treatments—can optimize, simplify and even beautify interior and exterior spaces. The importance of electronic control systems in homes today really can’t be underestimated. Most of our systems already have multi-room audio with streaming Rhapsody, Pandora, Spotify and iTunes, for example. So it shouldn’t be surprising that timing when to introduce technology into the remodeling process is crucial. The earlier, the better. You want to bring in your technology consultant when you’re sitting down with your architect or builder and talking about what you want to do in terms of renovating. The sooner we are involved, the sooner we can help make important choices and give you ideas that you haven’t even thought of that could really change the outcome.


DAVE NEUMAIER, iHome Integration
What are the most exciting trends in home entertainment?
A study by the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University says home automation is predicted to be the number-two trend in residential remodeling over the next five to 10 years. Home entertainment today is style-driven, with custom-matched speakers, small aperture speakers and invisible speakers creating a seamless look. TVs are getting thinner and even curved. And 4K technology allows for larger

GALA 2014 Awards—Custom Presented by the Northern Virginia Building Industry Association and the Maryland Building Industry Association, the 2014 GALA (Great American Living) Awards—celebrating achievements in categories ranging from architecture and interior design to sales and marketing—saw some significant changes in the custom building and renovation categories this year. Rather than visiting each entry, the judges—four residential architects and a residential marketing professional—evaluated portfolio submissions instead. This shift encouraged a larger pool of entries in the custom categories.

The 2014 GALA Awards ceremony was held at the McLean Hilton in Tysons Corner on October 9. Winners of the custom categories are spotlighted on the following pages, while the remaining award-winners will be featured in the January/February 2015 issue of Home & Design.

DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE, CUSTOM HOME, SINGLE LOT
3,000 to 5,000 Square Feet:
The Retreat at Canal Corcoran, Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, P Four, OPaL, GPS Designs. Photography: Stacy Zarin Goldberg

5,001 to 7,000 Square Feet:
Jossan Residence, Arlington, Virginia, Evergreene Homes, W.C. Ralston Architects. Photography: Thomas H. Field

Over 7,000 Square Feet:
Oakton Custom Residence, Oakton, Virginia, Fried Companies, W.C. Ralston Architects. Photography: Maxine Schnitzer

DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE, CUSTOM OR CUSTOMIZED INFILL HOME
Under 3,000 Square Feet:
503 Stonewall Avenue, Middleburg, Virginia, PR Construction, Sutton Yantis Associates Architects. Photography: Bill Sutton

3,000 to 5,000 Square Feet:
Churchill Model, McLean, Virginia, Relux Homes, James McDonald Associate Architects. Photography: BTW Images, LLC

5,001 to 7,000 Square Feet:
Amberley Model, Great Falls, Virginia, Architectural Construction, James McDonald Associate Architects. Photography: Greg Hadley

Over 7,000 Square Feet:
Grenata Lot 11, Leesburg, Virginia, Creighton Enterprises. Photography: James Torrenzano

DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE, RENOVATIONS OR ADDITIONS
Under $500,000:
Klaff Renovation, Potomac Falls, Virginia, Great Falls Construction. Photography: Bob Narod

$500,000 to $1,000,000:
Bethesda Renovation at Bradley Hills, Bethesda, Maryland, BOWA. Photography: Bob Narod

Over $1,000,000:
Innsbruck Avenue, Great Falls, Virginia, Great Falls Construction, Sutton Yantis Associates Architects. Photography: Bob Narod

ASID Maryland Chapter 2014 Awards Members of the Maryland Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) gathered on September 24 for their annual awards celebration at Historic Savage Mill in Savage, Maryland. A jury of ASID members from another state chapter judged the competition. Photos of the first- and second-place award-winners are shown on these pages, along with a list of projects that received honorable mention. A complete list of the winning projects can be found at homeanddesign.com.

HISTORIC DESIGN First Place:
- Scarlett Breeding, AIA, Alt Breeding Schwarz Architects. Classic Detail. Photography: Tim Lee.

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN  First Place:
- Dianne Rohrer, ASID; Mary Judy, Rohrer Studio. Bowe Stewart Residence. Photography: Thomas Arledge.

COMMERCIAL DESIGN  First Place:
- Diane S. Taitt, ASID, De Space Designs LLC. YMCA Anthony Bowen. Photography: Kenneth M. Wyner.

RESIDENTIAL KITCHEN/BATH DESIGN  First Place:
- Bob Berman, Johnson Berman Interior Design & Architecture. Master Bathroom Renovation, Greenspring Valley Residence. Photography: Phil Weber.

DESIGN ELEMENT  First Place:
- Debbie McHale, Allied ASID, Interior Transformations. Artistic Symmetry. Photography: Kenneth M. Wyner.

RESIDENTIAL KITCHEN/BATH DESIGN  Second Place:
- Diane S. Taitt, ASID, De Space Designs LLC. House 13. Photography: Maxine Schnitzer.

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN Second Place:
- Linda Hartman, Allied ASID, Karen Renée Interior Design, Inc. Sorority House. Photography: Pete Albert.

HONORABLE MENTION AWARDS

COMMERCIAL DESIGN
- Scarlett Breeding, AIA, Alt Breeding Schwarz Architects; New Day.
- Barbara Magistro, ASID, GTM Architects; Fed Med.
- Barbara Magistro, ASID, GTM Architects; Tioga.
- Barbara Magistro, ASID, GTM Architects; Vion.

HOSPITALITY DESIGN
- Liz Dickson, Allied ASID, Millbrook Circle Interior Design; The Johns Hopkins Club.
- Susan Sunderland, ASID, and Cheryl DiMenna, ASID, Sunderland Interiors, Inc.; Liquid Lib’s.

HEALTH/LIFE CARE
- Sheryl T. McLean, Décoria Interior Design; Women’s Wellness Center.

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN
- Syntha Harris, StoryBook Rooms; From Traditional to Contemporary.
- Scarlett Breeding, Alt Breeding Schwarz Architects; New York Meets Annapolis Waterfront.
- Stephanie Simmons, Allied ASID, Karen Renée Interior Design; Farmhouse Update.

RESIDENTIAL KITCHEN/BATH DESIGN
- Syntha Harris, StoryBook Rooms; Traditional Bathroom Gets a Makeover.

SHOW HOUSE/MODEL HOME
- Gina Fitzsimmons, ASID, Fitzsimmons Design Associates; The Sail Loft.

DESIGN ELEMENT
- Henry Johnson, ASID, Amanda Johnson, Johnson Berman Interior Design & Architecture; Textile Commission Collection.
- Syntha Harris, StoryBook Rooms; Custom Built-In Contemporary Banquette.

2015 Designers' Choice Awards Each year, Home & Design polls hundreds of industry professionals to discover their picks for the leaders in this innovative, ever-evolving community—as well as their votes of confidence in those just making their mark. We also ask area architects and designers to vote on their favorite industry resources, in categories ranging from audio/video and appliance showrooms to antiques dealers and art galleries. Following is 
a list of the complete survey results for 2015.

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ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN AWARDS

Hall of Fame Architect
Frank Schlesinger, FAIA
Schlesinger Associate Architects Washington, DC
schlesingerarchitects.com

Hall of Fame Designer
Sophie Prévost, ASID
COLEPRÉVOST
Washington, DC
coleprevost.com

Hall of Fame Landscape Architect
Amy Mills
DCA Landscape Architecture
Washington, DC
dcalandarch.com

Modern Architect
Ralph Cunningham, FAIA
Cunningham | Quill Architects
Washington, DC
cunninghamquill.com

Traditional Architect
Anne Y. Decker, AIA
Anne Decker ArchitectsBethesda, Maryland
annedeckerarchitects.com

Custom Builder
Sandy Spring Builders, LLC
Bethesda, Maryland
sandyspringbuilders.com

Landscape Firm
GardenWise, Inc.
Arlington, Virginia
gardenwiseinc.com

Kitchen Design Firm
Aidan Design
Silver Spring, Maryland
aidandesign.com

Design/Build Firm
Anthony Wilder Design/Build, Inc.
Cabin John, Maryland
anthonywilder.com

Up & Coming Designer
Michael Hampton
Michael Hampton Design
Washington, DC
michaelhamptondesign.com

Up & Coming Architect
Bill Smith
Studio Smith
Washington, DC
studiosmithdc.com

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INDUSTRY FAVORITES

Appliance Dealer
Ferguson
Area Showrooms
ferguson.com

Art Resource
Longview Gallery
Washington, DC
longviewgallerydc.com

Audio/Video Specialist
Electronic Home Environments
Annapolis, Maryland
ehenvironments.com

Cady’s Alley Showroom
Donghia
Washington, DC
donghia.com

Custom Closet Company
California Closets
Chantilly, Virginia
calclosets.com

Decorative Painter/Studio
Blue Line Studios
Warrenton, Virginia
bluelinestudios1.com

Fabric Showroom
Hines & Company
Washington, DC
hinescompany.com

Contemporary Furniture Showroom (Retail) 
Theodores
Washington, DC
theodores.com

Traditional Furniture Showroom (Retail)
Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams
Washington, DC, and Tysons Corner, Virginia
mgbwhome.com

Furnishings to the Trade
J. Lambeth
Washington, DC
jlambeth.com

Lighting Dealer
Dominion Electric
Arlington, Virginia
dominionelectric.com

Local Furniture Maker
Salvations Architectural Furnishings
Silver Spring, Maryland
salvationsaf.com

Surface Showroom
Marblex
Farifax, Virginia
marblexinc.com

Tile Dealer
Italo Ceramica
Rockville, Maryland
italoceramica.com

Wallcoverings Showroom
Kravet
Washington, DC
kravet.com

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Rooms We Love: Outdoor Room When the owners of an Annapolis home on the South River tasked designer Michelle Miller with decorating their interiors, they also asked her to outfit their outdoor living spaces in casual, easygoing style. She set out to complement the beautiful landscaping already in place with clean-lined, comfortable furniture that would make entertaining a breeze.

“We created little environments out there, just like we’d do inside,” Miller explains. Her furniture plan encompassed three gathering areas on a long terrace located under the rear deck of the house, overlooking the pool and the river beyond. On one end, a large, modular sectional provides plenty of seating; plush cushions in Holly Hunt outdoor fabric combine comfort and practicality. In the center, a long dining table boasts benches on either side to seat lots of kids. And on the far end, a pair of inviting lounge chairs with matching ottomans creates a perfect spot for two. Brown Jordan chaise longues around the pool invite sunbathers to linger. Custom pillows reflect the bright colors of perennials blooming on the grounds.

“My clients love the water and being outside,” Miller says. “When kids are in the pool, the adults can sit here and relax—they don’t have to be on the pool deck.”

Miller purposely kept the seating arrangements open so guests can navigate through the space without feeling blocked. “One of the things I try to avoid is overwhelming a space with too much furniture,” she says. “There’s a lot of beauty in simplicity.

INTERIOR DESIGN: MICHELLE MILLER, Michelle Miller Interiors, Baltimore, Maryland. PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMIE SENTZ.


Other Rooms We Love:

Bathroom

Bedroom

Dining Room

Kitchen

Living Room

Rooms We Love: Bathroom

After 16 years of living with a circa-1970s master bath in her Potomac, Maryland, home, Deborah Kalkstein—owner of Contemporaria in DC’s Cady’s Alley—was ready for a fresh, modern overhaul that would turn the dated room into an inviting, functional space.

The original bath was spacious at 12 by 18 feet; Kalkstein further opened it up by removing a wall that separated the shower stall from the rest of the room. She replaced it with a sleek, glass shower enclosure. “We also took out drop ceilings above the sinks to allow the mirrors to go all the way to the ceiling,” the designer explains.

Kalkstein’s material selections emphasized functionality and a spare, contemporary look. “I wanted everything to be easy to live with,” she says. Choices include gray-tinted, poured-concrete counters and custom vessel sinks made of crisp, white Corian with tk fixtures installed in the walls to keep the surfaces uncluttered. The custom, wrap-around vanity is dark-stained oak with plenty of carefully considered, customized storage; for example, a series of deep drawers holds toiletry bottles standing up.

Floors and walls are clad in the same porcelain tile, but the floor tiles are large format and smooth while the wall tiles are smaller and textured. The shower surround is marble and the luxurious sunken tub is made of white Corian.

The lighting plan was important to the design. “We used warm LED lights with different switches for lighting different areas of the room,” Kalkstein says. Simple, roll-up shades provide privacy while admitting natural light.

INTERIOR & BATH DESIGN: DEBORAH KALKSTEIN, Contemporaria, Washington, DC. CONTRACTOR: Patagonia Enterprises, LLC, Point of Rocks, Maryland.  PHOTOGRAPHY: STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG.

 


Other Rooms We Love:

Bedroom

Dining Room

Kitchen

Living Room

Outdoor Room

 

Rooms We Love: Kitchen Homeowners in Avenel wished to update their 15-year-old house and contacted designer Kristin Peake for the job. To overhaul the builder-grade kitchen, Peake tapped Hedy Shashaani of Jack Rosen Custom Kitchens to design a fresh, transitional space that would reflect the home’s aesthetic while imparting new levels of quality and functionality.

The original layout was problematic, with one large, angular island that held the cooktop, downdraft hood and sink. The size and location of the island impeded traffic flow, and the walk-in pantry was awkwardly situated. “We created flow by breaking up the island into two,” Shashaani explains. “Now each island has its own purpose.” One is for food prep and the other—with seating for five and a wine cooler—is for entertaining; located by the breakfast area, it also serves as a buffet. The walk-in pantry was replaced with a wall of easy-access pantry cupboards.

Shashaani relocated the cooktop (now a 36-inch gas range and oven from the Wolf Pro Series) to the far wall. The new range is paired with a custom hood in contrasting finishes that measures over seven feet, creating an attractive focal point for the room. “A lot of houses have downdraft ventilation, but it’s rarely sufficient,” Shashaani comments.

The peripheral cabinetry, by Elmwood, is painted in Warm Concrete with Oyster glaze, while the furniture-like islands are stained in Driftwood. Dishware is stored in a hutch with antiqued mirror doors near the breakfast area. The countertops and backsplash are made of honed Calcutta Gold marble.

KITCHEN DESIGN: HEDY SHASHAANI, Jack Rosen Custom Kitchens, Rockville, Maryland. INTERIOR DESIGN: KRISTIN PEAKE, Kristin Peake Interiors, LLC, Rockville, Maryland. CONTRACTOR: GREG LENTZ. PHOTOGRAPHY: STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG.


Other Rooms We Love:

Bathroom

Bedroom

Dining Room

Living Room

Outdoor Room

Rooms We Love: Dining Room When redesigning a Bethesda home for a couple that loves to entertain, Andrew Law envisioned an elegant dining room where guests could linger with comfortable seating, plenty of space and a warm, welcoming feel.

To achieve his goal, Law first created a connection between the dining room and nearby library that encourages guests to congregate in both. To do this, he commissioned Classic Woodworking to install millwork in the library that matches the wainscoting in the dining room; made of quarter-sawn oak, the new millwork has a distinctive grain—which decorative paint studio Billet Collins then matched on the dining room’s wainscoting and crown molding with a faux-bois finish. Hand-blocked wallpaper by Rose Tarlow picks up what Law calls “putty with crimson accents” in the faux finish that “create warmth and depth in the room.”

Law furnished the dining room with clean-lined, traditional pieces. A Bausman & Company dining table is paired with British Khaki dining chairs and reproduction Chippendale end chairs in Chinese red leather from Rose Tarlow. A sofa by Edward Ferrell + Lewis Mittman and a wing chair by Victoria Hagan allow “guests to finish dinner and linger,” says Law. Twin iron consoles by Salvations Architectural Furnishings are topped with limestone; they complement the hand-stitched iron-and-vellum sconces and chandelier by Roman Thomas. Putty-colored silk-and-linen draperies warm the room and a pale blue-painted ceiling offsets its warmth. Architectural photographs above the consoles, taken on a trip to Prague by the homeowner, sound a more personal, contemporary note.   

INTERIOR DESIGN: ANDREW LAW, Andrew Law Interior Design, Washington, DC. PHOTOGRAPHY: ANGIE SECKINGER.


Other Rooms We Love:

Bathroom

Bedroom

Kitchen

Living Room

Outdoor Room

Rooms We Love: Living Room A Victorian house in Georgetown beckoned to a family of six. But its interiors were woefully outdated and inconvenient, so the owners tapped interior designer Marika Meyer for an update that would make it more functional for family living, with public spaces such as the living room conveying a sense of graciousness and sophistication for large-scale entertaining.

Separated from an adjoining parlor by pocket doors, the living room boasts distinctive features such as the original, marble-clad fireplace and a turret. Meyer enhanced the room’s elegance with additional millwork, then added built-in bookshelves. “The owners are big readers,” she observes. “The bookshelves add a personal dimension and a casual vibe.”

In its previous iteration, the living room had a convoluted floor plan with too many tables and limited seating. Meyer incorporated a baby grand piano in the turret and repurposed a crystal chandelier from the dining room above it. Existing sofas and a glass-topped coffee table were re-oriented for a more functional furniture plan, and an antique French commode and mirror and an occasional chair by Victoria Hagan, upholstered in vibrant blue, add interest. Niermann Weeks floor lamps flank each sofa and a Tibetan rug is layered over a thinly woven sisal to create texture.

A Restoration Hardware console is paired with a series of graphic prints from Natural Curiosities, while above the fireplace, an original painting by Wolf Kahn creates a focal point. Meyer eschewed window treatments in favor of the existing shutters. “This way,” she says, “we kept the space open and airy.”

INTERIOR DESIGN: MARIKA MEYER, Marika Meyer Interiors, LLC, Bethesda, Maryland. PHOTOGRAPHY: ANGIE SECKINGER.


Other Rooms We Love:

Bathroom

Bedroom

Dining Room

Kitchen

Outdoor Room

Rooms We Love: Bedroom A couple with three young children and a correspondingly hectic lifestyle were looking to remodel their Alexandria home one room at a time. They hired Paola McDonald of Olamar Interiors for the job, which started with the master bedroom. “Ultimately, the bedroom felt like a priority because of their busy lives,” McDonald says. “They asked me to turn it into a retreat where they could rest and recharge.”

The wife also requested a “coastal” vibe for the space. “She wanted it to have a beachy feel, but without being beach-themed,” explains McDonald. “I used colors, textures and materials to evoke the experience of being at the beach.”

The large bedroom needed a focal point, so McDonald created an accent wall covered in large-format wallpaper from Thibaut, then placed the couple’s Restoration Hardware bedstead, with its imposing upholstered headboard, against it. The wallpaper, in shades of cool blue and earthy brown, conveys that coastal sensibility; custom linen Roman shades emphasize the brown while surrounding walls painted Benjamin Moore’s Constellation pick up the restful blue hue.

McDonald used the elaborate tray ceiling to add interest to the room. She painted the moldings and sloped surfaces crisp white, then covered the ceiling in sand-colored grasscloth from Thibaut. Both wallcoverings give off a metallic shimmer that imparts a layer of sophistication.

A rope-and-bronze chandelier, blue-glass bedside lamps and a bronze-framed floor mirror—all from Uttermost—complete the picture. Rustic night tables and a tufted bench are from Caracole.

INTERIOR DESIGN: Paola McDonald, IDS, Olamar Interiors, Haymarket, Virginia. PHOTOGRAPHY: Greg Tinius.

 


Other Rooms We Love:

Bathroom

Dining Room

Kitchen

Living Room

Outdoor Room

HOME&DESIGN, published bi-monthly by Homestyles Media Inc., is the premier magazine of architecture and fine interiors for the Washington, DC, Maryland and Virginia region.

The company also publishes an annual H&D Sourcebook of ideas and resources for homeowners and professionals alike. H&D Chesapeake Views is published bi-annually and showcases fine home design and luxury living in and around the Chesapeake Bay.

The H&D Portfolio of 100 Top Designers spotlights the superior work of selected architects, interior designers and landscape architects in major regions of the US.

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