Farnady's  Ball Base Center Table and Cube Dining Chair, pictured in DC's Mellon Auditorium, where neoclassical interiors remind the designer of historic buildings in her native Budapest.  Photo: Jennifer Hughes
The Curved Coffee Table, in black metal and off-white wood. Photo: Jennifer Hughes
Katalin Farnady instills a sense of the unexpected in her furniture creations.
Squared Up and Rolled Up Dining Chairs, with velvet seats and bronzed-metal bases.
The Julia Console, in matte- and high-gloss black wood.
The Curved Coffee Table, in black metal and off-white wood. Photo: Jennifer Hughes
Katalin Farnady instills a sense of the unexpected in her furniture creations.
Squared Up and Rolled Up Dining Chairs, with velvet seats and bronzed-metal bases.
The Julia Console, in matte- and high-gloss black wood.

Artistic Approach

Katalin Farnady’s private-label collection marries modern lines and Old World soul

Katalin Farnady never dreamed of designing a furniture collection, though many of her industry colleagues urged her to give it a go. Until one night in 2019, when she opened her sketch pad. “In 10 minutes, I had 40-some pieces drawn,” recalls the Annapolis-based interior designer. “It was in me all along, but I never let it come to the surface.”

In March, Farnady Furniture was born. A collection of 25 table and chair prototypes—many handmade locally by Niermann Weeks—expresses the designer’s eclectic, modern aesthetic. They also offer a nod to the Art Deco and Art Nouveau influences of her native Budapest. Lighting, mirrors and sculptures are in production, while plans are underway to expand color and fabric options. And in June, Farnady will unveil her creations in EJ Victor at High Point Market. For details, call 443-822-3248 or visit farnadyinteriors.com.

Why did you decide to design furniture?
I try to incorporate one-of-a-kind pieces in my work, but they’re not always easy to find. And creating furniture gives me an opportunity to tell people who I am as a designer.

What went into your collection’s DNA?
I like forward-thinking, I like modern and I like the unexpected. But there’s always a base you have to touch upon. For me, that’s Art Deco and Art Nouveau. I can trace back many of my pieces to architectural details such as a window frame, gate or front door in Budapest.

Where do you find design inspiration?
I find inspiration in travel, art, fashion—pretty much everywhere. I am also drawn to geometric forms. For example, swim noodles drifting together in the pool led me to design the Rolled Up Dining Chair. I love the architecture of it.

Who are your console tables named after?
I wanted to do something that represents me as a mother as well as my three teenage daughters, Emma, Julia and Adele. The pieces capture their personalities.

How did it feel to send your creations off to High Point?
When I first went to High Point 20 years ago, I was blown away by the products and people talking about their designs. Never did I imagine I’d be one of them.